8 results found
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How to Incorporate Women and Gender Equality in the Management of the Crisis Response

Monday, March 23, 2020

Crisis management or emergency situations such as COVID-19 can have serious impacts on the lives of women and girls, if gender dimensions are not considered. Issues such as care work, economic autonomy, physical or sexual violence, women's participation in decision-making, disaggregation of data by sex, gender analysis, and irregular migration are just some of the areas of concern that must be part of an effective response to the health crisis that the world is going through right now.

Women’s Needs and Gender Equality in Lebanon’s COVID-19 Response

Monday, March 23, 2020

Women’s and girls’ immediate and long-term needs must be addressed and integrated into Lebanon’s response, in order to both ensure women’s access to services and human rights, and to enable women to equally continue to contribute to shaping the response. Based on lessons learned from other epidemics, namely Ebola and Zika virus, this paper outlines gender issues related to the COVID-19 outbreak and response in Lebanon. A checklist for both immediate and longer-term...

Gender, Masculinities and Violent Extremism in North Africa: a Research Agenda

Sunday, January 12, 2020

With support from the UK Government, UN Women ROAS has been working since 2017 to deliver better evidence through quality research on gender equality, masculinities and violent extremism in North Africa to inform regional and global policy-making on the prevention of violent extremism (PVE) and Women, Peace, and Security. This page serves as a platform for the different publications created under the project.

Gender Equality and Violent Extremism: a Research Agenda for Libya

Monday, November 18, 2019

This research report examines the gender dynamics of radicalization to violence in Libya and efforts to counter and prevent violent extremism. Based on primary research in Libya, this report analyses new data collected in the field (October 2018 to March 2019), and via a survey instrument (March-June 2019). The research investigates the gendered motivations of individuals to join violent extremist and terrorist groups, and how gender inequality and discrimination within Libyan society interact with other economic, political and religious factors to spread violent extremism. The report explores how social constructions of masculinity and femininity are manipulated by violent extremist groups through their recruitment strategies and tactics of group control. As well as these gender dynamics, the research investigates Libyan women’s responses; how and why they seek to counter and prevent violent extremism in their communities.

Policy Brief: Misogyny and Violent Extremism - Implications for Preventing Violent Extremism

Sunday, October 13, 2019

The policy brief examines why and how radicalization to violence occurs from a gender perspective. In particular, it analyzes the underexplored relationship between attitudes and practices indicating misogyny (defined as both fear and hatred of women and/or the feminine) and support for violent extremism. Gender analysis of survey data collected in four countries (Indonesia, Bangladesh, the Philippines, and Libya) provides evidence of a mutually reinforcing dynamic of misogyny and violent extremism.

Addressing Gender Amongst Syrian Refugees in Lebanon

Wednesday, October 9, 2019

In Lebanon, Syrian refugee women and girls of diverse backgrounds continue to confront widespread and systemic gender inequality, which manifests in less access to resources, services, and opportunities, as well as higher risks of violence, abuse, and exploitation. This research brief summarizes key gender analysis findings from UN and humanitarian partner assessments in effort to raise the profile and understanding of gender inequalities amongst Syrian refugees and improve the gender responsiveness of humanitarian action in Lebanon.

Empowerment and accountability for gender equality in humanitarian action and crisis response 2018

Monday, July 29, 2019

Humanitarian needs continue to grow with nearly 132 million people in need of assistance in 2018, due to conflict, persecution, and natural disasters. The average humanitarian crisis now lasts more than nine years, and periods of forced displacement more than seventeen. Women and girls who make up approximately half of this 132 million face daily discrimination and violence. The breakdown of protection mechanisms and destruction of essential services and economic structures in crises hits the already marginalized hardest.

EU-Madad Regional Programme Brief

Thursday, September 27, 2018

This brief provides an overview of the regional programme “Strengthening the Resilience of Syrian Women and Girls and Host Communities in Iraq, Jordan and Turkey”. The Programme is implemented by UN Women with the financial support of the European Union through the EU Regional Trust Fund in Response to the Syrian Crisis.

1 - 8 of 8 Results