17
results found
1 - 17 of 17 Results
Date:
Few Syrian refugee and Lebanese women participate in the labour force in Lebanon, often due to critical gender barriers: housework and childcare obligations. This is particularly true for low-income women, who participate in economic activities at lower rates than men and are often unable to afford home help. Inadequate or absent childcare services contribute to women’s economic inactivity and serve as barriers that limit women’s mobility.
Date:
This sector-specific gender analysis provides evidence on which the EU, EU Member States, and other stakeholders may base strategic priorities for action in support of gender equality over the next seven years in Lebanon, in line with the EU’s global Gender Action Plan III (GAP III) framework.
Date:
The objective of this regional assessment is to look at the implications of the macroeconomic response to the COVID-19 pandemic in the Arab region. The regional mapping allows for identification of the dominant trends and policy priorities across different areas of interventions and looks at the potential implications of [largely] gender-blind macroeconomic responses and investments during the first six months of the pandemic.
Date:
This newsletter captures the latest updates on the implementation of the Women’s Peace and Humanitarian Fund (WPHF) in Lebanon. The newsletter includes the key highlights and achievements of the WPHF programme partners' towards enhancing women’s participation in the Beirut Port Explosion’s response and recovery process.
Date:
UN Women is at the forefront of the global drive to remove gender barriers because we believe in a world of justice and human rights for everyone. Towards that end, and as the only United Nations entity dedicated to gender equality, we marshal the world’s best gender expertise and the considerable resources of the United Nations. We connect people in many realms, the national and international, the public and private, activists and officials. Together, our efforts are more than any of us could pursue alone.
Date:
Gender equality cannot be achieved in Lebanon without dismantling the kafala system and creating legal protections for domestic workers. Women make up an estimated 76 per cent of all migrant workers and 99 per cent of migrant domestic workers who come to Lebanon for employment.
Date:
The results detailed in this country brief overwhelming speak to increased concerns for safety, both inside and outside the home (as a result of the pandemic), increased secondary trauma, specifically, the witnessing of violence against women, and online harassment. Most respondents believed tackling gender-based violence to be a priority in the COVID-19 response and voiced a willingness to report violations.
Date:
To help link businesses in need of support with services providers in Lebanon, including those supported by UN Women, UN Women has undertaken a mapping of ongoing initiatives and is actively working to pair those in need with those entities offering support. As investment is made to strengthen national production and bolster employment opportunities, women owned-MSMEs are an important vehicle for change and growth.
Date:
This paper assesses, estimates and analyses the expected impact of the economic crisis on women, looking specifically at issues of job loss and unemployment.
Date:
Women and girls admitted to COVID-19 community isolation centers are particularly vulnerable to be subjected to harassment, violence, exploitation and abuse due to specific gendered protection risks, including being confined to an isolated space, the gendered staffing of centers, the economic vulnerability of women and girls, and avenues to seek help being limited or hard to reach. WHO and UN Women are co-leading interventions within the isolation facilities to protection the needs of women and girls, through protection monitoring, ensuring complaint and feedback mechansisms, community messaging, and training and capacity building.
Date:
There is a tendency for the pursuit of gender equality to fall by the wayside during times of crises and to be considered as a goal of secondary importance that can be placed back on the agenda once economic growth has recovered. But the reality is that taking steps towards gender equality is part of the solution and supporting women to enter the formal economy in significant numbers will widen Lebanon’s tax base and support the fiscal sustainability of Lebanon’s social security programmes.
Date:
This Gender Alert, issued in May 2020 in partnership with the National Commission for Lebanese Women, UN Women, WHO and UNFPA, focuses on women, gender equality, and the economy in Lebanon over the first months of the COVID-19 pandemic. It provides a) observations on GBV issues from the field; b) compiles available secondary data from Lebanon, and, c) consolidates guidance and programmatic tools related to gender issues.
Date:
This UN Women newsletter is a brief summary of news related to women’s rights and gender equality in Lebanon during the reporting period. It also includes data and trends regarding the impact of the outbreak of the COVID-19 pandemic on women and girls in Lebanon, and on UN Women’s work at both the individual, community and national level, to respond to the crisis.
Date:
Women have been at the core of Lebanon’s popular protests since they began on October 17, 2019. Assessing the first 58 days of protests, this paper seeks to contribute to the documentation of women’s representation, roles, and demands within Lebanon’s protests, while also examining the use of gendered language and norms by all sides of thecountry’s complex landscape. It situates this action within the broader women, peace and security framework, which recognizes women as political actors and peace and security leaders and brokers.
Date:
The report also describes how the determinants of low female labour force participation in the region have been discussed in scholarly literature, prepares economic and gender profiles of 17 Arab countries and puts forward a synthesis of policy recommendations for female-inclusive growth in the future.
Date:
This study seeks to generate a sound understanding of women’s financial inclusion, and more specifically in conflict and post-conflict situations in selected Arab States; it assesses prospects for and challenges to the achievement of women’s financial inclusion and documents good practices and lessons learned to inform UN Women’s future interventions in this area.
Date:
This report outlines how women’s economic empowerment can be used as a strategic tool to assist policy-makers and companies to reach their growth-related goals.