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Few Syrian refugee and Lebanese women participate in the labour force in Lebanon, often due to critical gender barriers: housework and childcare obligations. This is particularly true for low-income women, who participate in economic activities at lower rates than men and are often unable to afford home help. Inadequate or absent childcare services contribute to women’s economic inactivity and serve as barriers that limit women’s mobility.
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In 2017 Lebanese parliament passed a new electoral law, in the lead up to the 2018 parliamentary elections.
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This sector-specific gender analysis provides evidence on which the EU, EU Member States, and other stakeholders may base strategic priorities for action in support of gender equality over the next seven years in Lebanon, in line with the EU’s global Gender Action Plan III (GAP III) framework.
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UN Women is at the forefront of the global drive to remove gender barriers because we believe in a world of justice and human rights for everyone. Towards that end, and as the only United Nations entity dedicated to gender equality, we marshal the world’s best gender expertise and the considerable resources of the United Nations. We connect people in many realms, the national and international, the public and private, activists and officials. Together, our efforts are more than any of us could pursue alone.
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In October 2019, hundreds of thousands of Lebanese people took to the streets to protest the imposition of new taxes and the worsening economic, social and political crises gripping the country.
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This assessment developed by UNW, UNHCR, WFP and UNICEF demonstrate gender inequalities across the Syrian refugee population, limiting access, rights and opportunities for women and girls, particularly as related to economic participation, education, food insecurity, humanitarian assistance, legal issues, and wider protections, including sexual and gender-based violence.
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Given the unique vulnerability of Syrian refugee women to GBV and specific linkages to economic vulnerability, UN Women together with UNHCR and the ILO commissioned a study to explore the (relationships between livelihoods and protection risks for Syrian refugee women, with specific aim to ensure programming is designed to mitigate risks and maximize positive outcomes.
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Women and girls admitted to COVID-19 community isolation centers are particularly vulnerable to be subjected to harassment, violence, exploitation and abuse due to specific gendered protection risks, including being confined to an isolated space, the gendered staffing of centers, the economic vulnerability of women and girls, and avenues to seek help being limited or hard to reach. WHO and UN Women are co-leading interventions within the isolation facilities to protection the needs of women and girls, through protection monitoring, ensuring complaint and feedback mechansisms, community messaging, and training and capacity building.
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This initial gender analysis is based on the first wave of the Join Multi-Sectoral Needs Assessment (MSNA) led by Lebanese Red Cross. The findings provide some initial understanding of the differential impact female and male headed households
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The Beirut explosion is taking place against a backdrop of the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic and a deep economic crisis, described by experts as the worst in Lebanon’s recent history, and it is also happening within a context of extreme structural gender inequalities.
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This document outlines UN Women’s response plan for the 2020 Beirut Plan – a plan that works across the humanitarian-development-peace and security nexus to provide immediate relief to those in need, and to ensure that longer term recovery and reconstruction both addresses the needs of women and girls, and promotes gender equality.